Pterosauria

(Obviously the best Mesozoic winged vertebrates.)

kiraraneko:

Quetzalcoatlus! These are so fun to do.. have 3 more planned so there will be 6 total. After that… requests maybe? :0

kiraraneko:

Quetzalcoatlus! These are so fun to do.. have 3 more planned so there will be 6 total. After that… requests maybe? :0

alphynix:

This is the pterosaur Dsungaripterus. It came from the early Cretaceous of China, about 125-100 million years ago, and had a 3m (9’10”) wingspan — small compared to some other pterosaurs, but easily as big as the very largest flight-capable birds alive today.
The most notable part of this animal is its head, which in some reconstructions can end up looking anything from “deliberately grotesque" to "unintentionally goofy”. It had long narrow tweezer-like jaws, with knobbly teeth set halfway back that appear to have been well-suited for crushing whatever it was feeding on. It has been traditionally reconstructed as a wading shellfish-eater due to this, although I’ve seen at least one argument that dsungaripterids may actually have been terrestrial opportunists, perhaps even predators using those powerful jaws and teeth to crack through bones.
The pose here is purely speculative. Perhaps this is a courtship ritual, showing off for a potential mate. Or perhaps it’s a threat display. It’s definitely not a landing pose, at least, because there’s a fossil trackway that indicates pterosaurs came down feet-first.
I don’t know, I just wanted to draw one of these guys doing a handstand.

alphynix:

This is the pterosaur Dsungaripterus. It came from the early Cretaceous of China, about 125-100 million years ago, and had a 3m (9’10”) wingspan — small compared to some other pterosaurs, but easily as big as the very largest flight-capable birds alive today.

The most notable part of this animal is its head, which in some reconstructions can end up looking anything from “deliberately grotesque" to "unintentionally goofy”. It had long narrow tweezer-like jaws, with knobbly teeth set halfway back that appear to have been well-suited for crushing whatever it was feeding on. It has been traditionally reconstructed as a wading shellfish-eater due to this, although I’ve seen at least one argument that dsungaripterids may actually have been terrestrial opportunists, perhaps even predators using those powerful jaws and teeth to crack through bones.

The pose here is purely speculative. Perhaps this is a courtship ritual, showing off for a potential mate. Or perhaps it’s a threat display. It’s definitely not a landing pose, at least, because there’s a fossil trackway that indicates pterosaurs came down feet-first.

I don’t know, I just wanted to draw one of these guys doing a handstand.

elijahshandseight:

Finally it’s here!
The most important paleo-thing I’ve ever written since How to Properly Restore the Winged Arms of Aviremigians - Final Corrections. An entire post about pterosaur  wings: shapes, colours, pycnofibres, thigh or ankle attachment, uropatagium and folding. Or, to put in another way: What You wanted to know about Pterosaur Wings but You’ve Never Asked!
You can read it here: http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2013/12/what-you-wanted-to-know-about-pterosaur.html
You don’t have the faintest idea how much work did I put in it. Let’s just say that I published a rough version of it around early December. So, like 9-10 months in development. Of course it will be a huge amount of crap since I’m not a paleontologist, but I tried to do my best.
Try to enjoy it!

elijahshandseight:

Finally it’s here!

The most important paleo-thing I’ve ever written since How to Properly Restore the Winged Arms of Aviremigians - Final Corrections. An entire post about pterosaur  wings: shapes, colours, pycnofibres, thigh or ankle attachment, uropatagium and folding. Or, to put in another way: What You wanted to know about Pterosaur Wings but You’ve Never Asked!

You can read it here: http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2013/12/what-you-wanted-to-know-about-pterosaur.html

You don’t have the faintest idea how much work did I put in it. Let’s just say that I published a rough version of it around early December. So, like 9-10 months in development. Of course it will be a huge amount of crap since I’m not a paleontologist, but I tried to do my best.

Try to enjoy it!

rhamphotheca:

Flock of Ancient ‘Butterfly-Headed’ Flying Reptiles Discovered

by Tia Ghose

An ancient flying reptile with a bizarre, butterflylike head has been unearthed in Brazil.

The new-found pterosaur species, Caiuajara dobruskii, lived about 80 million years ago in an ancient desert oasis. The beast sported a strange bony crest on its head that looked like the wings of a butterfly, and had the wingspan needed to take flight at a very young age.

Hundreds of fossils from the reptile were unearthed in a single bone bed, providing the strongest evidence yet that the flying reptiles were social animals, said study co-author Alexander Kellner, a paleontologist at the Museu Nacional/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro in Brazil…

(read more: Live Science)

illustration by Maurilio Oliveira/Museu Nacional-UFR; photos: Manzig et al, PLOS ONE 2014