Pterosauria

(Obviously the best Mesozoic winged vertebrates.)

Nyctosaurus sebulbai by Jaime A. Headden:

No, this isn’t a real animal.Nyctosaurids are pterosaurs with incredibly long arms, but comparatively short feet. Darren Naish once speculated ([link]) that pterosaurs could attain flightless status in much the same ways as birds do, with reduction of the forelimbs and wing form, developing elongated hindlimbs in azhdarchid-like taxa and thus become giraffe or horse-like “quadrupedasaurs.” I wonder if the selection on the wings for form are so intensive this could ever happen. Indeed, it seems that it would be the feet first to go, the wings second, if ever. What if, instead, we got pterosaurs who walked with their wings, freeing their feet from locomotion?

(read more)

Nyctosaurus sebulbai by Jaime A. Headden:

No, this isn’t a real animal.

Nyctosaurids are pterosaurs with incredibly long arms, but comparatively short feet. Darren Naish once speculated ([link]) that pterosaurs could attain flightless status in much the same ways as birds do, with reduction of the forelimbs and wing form, developing elongated hindlimbs in azhdarchid-like taxa and thus become giraffe or horse-like “quadrupedasaurs.” I wonder if the selection on the wings for form are so intensive this could ever happen. Indeed, it seems that it would be the feet first to go, the wings second, if ever. What if, instead, we got pterosaurs who walked with their wings, freeing their feet from locomotion?

(read more)

drawingdinosaurs:

There’s a bit of a story behind the source of this picture, the gist of it is that this was supposed to be the first panel of a short comic that I may or may not finish. At least it makes a nice stand alone picture, right?
(Also, this is my first proper, fully coloured digital piece, yaldi!)

drawingdinosaurs:

There’s a bit of a story behind the source of this picture, the gist of it is that this was supposed to be the first panel of a short comic that I may or may not finish. At least it makes a nice stand alone picture, right?

(Also, this is my first proper, fully coloured digital piece, yaldi!)

dino-sours:

I absolutely love this painting by Luis Rey. As far as I’m concerned, this is the new definitive take on Triceratops.

Presented here in the unfeathered T. rex version that appeared in Dinosaur Art and the feathered T. rex version that appeared in The Big Golden Book of Dinosaurs.

elijahshandseight:

My restoration of the weird azhdarchoid Tupandactylus. This drawing is already on Tumblr, but I wanted to share the original one.
A Tupan Finger, 2012.Coloured with Tria Markers and pencils.Based on cockatiel, mandarin duck and monarch butterfly.References: Mike Hanson, John Conway, Matt Martyniuk.Link: http://smnt2000.deviantart.com/art/A-Tupan-Finger-322525626, http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2012/08/a-tupan-finger-aka-tupandactylus.html

elijahshandseight:

My restoration of the weird azhdarchoid Tupandactylus. This drawing is already on Tumblr, but I wanted to share the original one.

A Tupan Finger, 2012.
Coloured with Tria Markers and pencils.
Based on cockatiel, mandarin duck and monarch butterfly.
References: Mike HansonJohn ConwayMatt Martyniuk.
Link: http://smnt2000.deviantart.com/art/A-Tupan-Finger-322525626http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2012/08/a-tupan-finger-aka-tupandactylus.html

elijahshandseight:

Talking about Thalassodromeus, this is a personal depiction I’ve made in August 2012. I would do something different now but still this is one of the few drawings that I don’t hate.
I know that it has already been uploaded on Tumblr but trust me, this is the real deal. 
Thalassodromeus was a large pterodactyloid pterosaur found in northeastern Brazil. Thalassodromeus was believed by Kellner to have fed in a similar way to modern skimmers; trailing its lower jaw in the water while it flew. However, later research on its jaw and neck anatomy suggested that for this and other larger pterosaurs it would not be feasible to skim because of the drag: the energy expenditure would be too high. Kellner assigned Thalassodromeus to the Tapejaridae. Other analyses however, showed that it was, joined with Tupuxuara in a Thalassodrominae, more closely related to the Azhdarchidae.The Searunner, 2012.Coloured with Tria markers and pencils. Based on knobbed hornbill.References: Mark Witton, Jaime A. Headden, David Peters, Mike Hanson.Link: http://smnt2000.deviantart.com/art/The-Searunner-320498352, http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2012/08/the-searunner-aka-thalassodromeus.html

elijahshandseight:

Talking about Thalassodromeus, this is a personal depiction I’ve made in August 2012. I would do something different now but still this is one of the few drawings that I don’t hate.

I know that it has already been uploaded on Tumblr but trust me, this is the real deal. 

Thalassodromeus was a large pterodactyloid pterosaur found in northeastern Brazil. Thalassodromeus was believed by Kellner to have fed in a similar way to modern skimmers; trailing its lower jaw in the water while it flew. However, later research on its jaw and neck anatomy suggested that for this and other larger pterosaurs it would not be feasible to skim because of the drag: the energy expenditure would be too high. Kellner assigned Thalassodromeus to the Tapejaridae. Other analyses however, showed that it was, joined with Tupuxuara in a Thalassodrominae, more closely related to the Azhdarchidae.

The Searunner, 2012.
Coloured with Tria markers and pencils. Based on knobbed hornbill.
References: Mark Witton, Jaime A. Headden, David Peters, Mike Hanson.
Link: http://smnt2000.deviantart.com/art/The-Searunner-320498352http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2012/08/the-searunner-aka-thalassodromeus.html